• Angelica Sirotin

Sonic, EM Waves & The Future of War, Violence



Warfare and violence is commonly associated with guns, bulky machines of destruction, and other such physical constructions that are capable of wreaking mass havoc. But the future of warfare and violence will not be physical objects inflicting harm upon humans––rather, invisible inventions that will seek to disrupt life for malicious intents. Though many tend to disagree with me, I believe that the pandemic was an act of biological warfare. It disrupted economies, it caused the deaths of hundreds of innocent civilians and inflicted harm upon many others. But biological warfare is not the only thing that we should be concerned about. In fact, even more frightening is the notion of violence and warfare in the form of sonic or electromagnetic wave-based attacks. In today’s article, I will provide an overview of this future threat.


You may recall that back in late 2016, “Dozens of staffers at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba fell sick after reportedly hearing mysterious noises in their hotels or homes. Afterward, they reported severe physical symptoms, including vertigo, headaches, ear pain and even cognitive difficulties and hearing loss.” Researchers then captured the sound-waves to conduct an analysis. They found the following: the buzzing sound was ringing at a frequency of 7 kHz, or 7,000 cycles per second, resembling the sound of an Indies short-tailed cricket. Even though the researchers didn’t determine that it was the sound of a “Sonic Weapon”, this example still presents a very clear and evident case that waves can be mobilized for the purpose of incapacitating and harming humans, and waging violence.


Now imagine if a Sonic Weapon was purposely mobilized to attack an entire nation state. Scientific evidence exists that proves “The general consensus is that a loud enough sound could cause an air embolism in your lungs, which then travels to your heart and kills you. Alternatively, your lungs might simply burst from the increased air pressure. ... High-intensity ultrasonic sound (generally anything above 20KHz) can cause physical damage.” Unlike traditional warfare that requires preparations, armed troops, reserves, etc. all that an enemy must do to launch a Sonic Wave attack is to grab control of sound systems and launch the weapon everywhere at once.


In such an environment, guns become useless as a protection mechanism. One cannot simply shoot a gun into the air and destroy a wave… that is not how science works. Also, keep in mind that any savvy person who knows physics well enough could create their own at-home sonic weapon, just like 3D printers are capable of constructing guns today.


In addition to Sonic Waves, however, there also lurks the danger of the weaponization of the electromagnetic spectrum. Electromagnetic (EM) attacks are nothing new. For starters, federal agencies have been aware of the weaponization of EM probably since the 1990s. In fact, back in May 2012, “the Korea Herald reported that over 500 aircraft flying in and out of South Korea’s Incheon and Gimpo airports reported GPS failures, as did hundreds of ships and fishing boats in the sea west of Incheon Airport. The source of the EM fields was traced to the North Korean city of Kaesong, about 50 kilometers north of Incheon. South Korean officials indicated that North Korea had imported truck-based jamming systems in 2010 that had the capability to jam GPS signals.” (IEEE Spectrum) And since EM systems can be mobilized without detection, criminals can shut down computer networks without any trouble. What’s frightening is that all of our electronics are susceptible to EM attacks, and zero of them have the proper safeguards to avoid getting compromised (well, that is, unless you are already prepared).


The Bottom Line

Guns and physical weapons are not the only battle we must face. The threat of wave-based violence and warfare is looming, and the public and private sector must work together in order to implement proper safeguards against these new-age weapons... before it's too late.



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